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“I am only one,

But still I am one.

I cannot do everything,

But still I can do something;

And because I cannot do everything,

I will not refuse to do the something that I can do.”

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HISTORY OF THE GOLD RIBBON

From the American Childhood Cancer Organization (ACCO).

 

 

"History of the Gold Ribbon

 

Approximately 20 years ago, when the ACCO was known under its former name, the Candlelighters Childhood Cancer Foundation (CCCF), the gold ribbon was chosen to serve as the universal symbol for Childhood Cancer Awareness by CCCF board member Gigi Thorsen and a group of parents whose lives had been affected by childhood cancer.

 

Although many colors were considered, gold was agreed upon as the ideal choice for childhood cancer awareness because gold is a precious metal, and is therefore the perfect color to reflect the most precious thing in our lives—our children.

 

The CCCF funded production of the first gold ribbons in 1997 (in the form of lapel pins), and thanks to the dedication and commitment of this group of parents during the early years of our organization, the gold ribbon has now become an internationally-recognized symbol for childhood cancer awareness.

 

Today, the ACCO continues to utilize the emblematic power of the gold ribbon to build momentum for our campaigns, allowing individuals from all over the world to unite in solidarity behind this unifying symbol and to join in the ongoing fight for the eradication of all forms of childhood cancer."

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